Mar 29, 2021

Non-unanimous juries violate the 6th Amendment, but weren’t outlawed nationwide until 2020

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PBS NewsHour
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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1972 that non-unanimous juries—those that convict a defendant with a split decision—are a violation of the 6th Amendment. But a loophole, until recently, allowed two states to maintain the practice. Special Correspondent Tom Casciato looks at the roots of split-jury verdicts and what faces those convicted by them. This segment is part of our series “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.”

PRODUCER/CORRESPONDENT/EDITOR
Tom Casciato

CAMERA
Jeff Hutchens
Brad Serreno

FOOTAGE/STILLS:
Keith Amedee
Louisiana Parole Project
The Promise of Justice Initiative

SPECIAL THANKS
Kathleen Hughes

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Mirrored from: https://youtube.com/watch?v=Dj2BSakXs1w

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